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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
are a citizen of the united states, you have become the enemy. i do not see anything wrong with using drone strikes to take them out. i just do not they have done a good job, i believe. host: what do you think? you should be in charge of the program and targeting american citizens? -- who should be in charge? caller: i do not believe it should be the department of defense. understanding there are several 1r ectives, one being 5240- there is the required targeting of citizens, targeted hits for certifications of these drawings. some are purchased by organizations and various agencies. they are hitting civilians whether it is just electromagnetic or i pray that they are not killing innocent citizens. this is a question here. 30,000 additional drones to be released, tested, and evaluated over the united states? i think america needs to wake up. 30,000 additional draws while we have homelessness, veterans returning, you can put that kind of money over the united states of america. there are too many directives out there and contractors who are now using these devices targeting citizens as we si
. they're not used to dealing with guerrilla tactics like this and the french have said they're keen to pull out as soon as possible. whoever is left, whether it's a coalition of african forces or perhaps some un peacekeepers, they will have to adapt quickly if this is a change in tactics. >> north korean doctors have been killed in nigeria, the second attack on house workers and days after nine giving polio vaccinations were shot down. police say assailant broke into an apartment where the physicians or sleeping and be headed one of them. the other two had their throats cut. a new commander has taken charge in afghanistan. he has been given the responsibility of winding down the u.s.'s longest war. he took command from a general john allen in the afghan capital city -- in the afghan city of kabul. >> today is not about change, it's about continuity. what has not changed is the will of this coalition. what has not changed is our commitment to accomplish the mission. more and courtly, what has not changed is the inevitability of our success. >> is facing some tough challenges, among t
and i see that we could use this tool that we have, this capability, to make lives better and so i think it's, it's one of my goals. is to try to make the world a better place. >> by reprogramming cells to produce cleaner, more efficient versions of fuels and other chemicals we've all grown so dependant on, jay keasling has opened the door to a brighter, more sustainable future and that's what puts him on the next lis. i'm dr. sanjay gupta. hope to see you back here next sunday. >>> a cringe-worthy calendar in washington. the small thinking about big problems continues. welcome to "your money," i'm christine romans, ali velshi is in the snow trying to stay warm. march 1, automatic spending cuts take effect unless there's a deal to avoid them. this he were never supposed to happen. the results of a deal to end a debt ceiling debacle in 2011. next while congress takes a two-week break for easter and passover, funding for the federal government will expire. that means a shut-down if congress doesn't act in time. and april 15th, thanks to the no budget, no pay act, the house and senate
, and how to present the program, how to do what you're doing now. host: your in the u.s., based in afghanistan, what are you doing here in washington? guest: i am here to say that open media in afghanistan is a big achievement. not only for the public, but for everyone i want to say that this is a big achievement after 11 years we lost more than 39 journalists from 2001 up until now, more than hundreds of injuries, more than thousands of arrests and people who were insulted and faced with harassment. let's not lose this achievement. a side of focus on security forces, stress fractures in afghanistan, focusing on media for lots of afghan people. afghans are quite aware what is freedom of expression and how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on it and not lose it. host: while you're in u.s., are you having to justify the money you are receiving? guest: yes, i have to justify the money we are receiving and say that not only for nai media institute, or the organizations we are receiving the money from, from ucid, the sector, the deal is something to really need focus.
aware what is freedom of expression. how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on and not pollute it. >> what you are a share in washington, who are you talking to? are you having to justify the money you are receiving from the united states? >> yes, just to justify the money we are receiving, not only for the organization. defector, the field is something they really focus. >> in afghanistan we have different rules of receiving information it is a radio. all over the country. it is mostly popular in the city's that we have that. printed media is also more of a usable thing or a tool and the places people are in a couple. nowadays we are having social media where people are receiving the news. more than the 3% of the population of afghanistan through radio. >> you mentioned the literacy rates. here in afghanistan, literacy rate over all 28%. mail literacy -- average imasco years is a 11 average. female 7. given the and the numbers, how difficult is your job of getting a promotion to afghanis. >> when you see 20% of the population is more than 72% are eligible, i
head into a new week "on the money." it is the u.s. government versus standard & poor's. the most aggressive move yet by the justice department to hold accountable a financial company at the center of the financial melt down of 2008. the $5 billion civil suit charges s&p intended to defraud investors, aaa ratings they did not deserve. standard & poor's' attorney says not so farst fast. >> rhe ratings that were issued were believed by the people who issued them and that's what the government has got to disprove, that -- the government's got to show in this case not that a lot of people lost money because of their investments. the government has to show that standard & poor's literally disbelieved the tradings. >> meanwhile, choppy weweek for the markets. dow with its worse day of the year on monday falling triple digits and then getting most of that back on tuesday. the markets rebounded later in the week. so what's next? >> i still think we're going to have a correction. the markets started the year with the investors pretty complacent. now they're almost euphoric. everybody you h
will be talking about it on tuesday. the numbers -- you can also send us an e-mail, join us at corridor.com -- twitter.com/cspanwj. great expectations, immigration is one of the issues on the president's agenda. he may get much of what he wants in part because a bipartisan support on the issue of immigration. he will look for ways to declare victory on guns and climate change. the focus on the economy, that is one headline we are getting. the front page of the washington post -- the reporting of scott wilson, the chief white house reporter for the washington post. chris van hollen is our guest on c-span's newsmakers program. he is a leading democrat in the house of representatives. >> the president will be delivering his state of the union address this week. i think he will address those questions. we are so caught up in dealing with these short-term, self- imposed crises that is undermining our ability to come up with a long-term comprehensive planned. there are philosophical differences. our republican colleagues do not believe that there is any role for the government beyond providin
.. there were no towns, and i could see us just sitting their like we had forever so we started playing out camps to build rangers. so you have to understand the context of my level of where we were triet after two tours of vietnam combat a was to be a soldier because we had done all these things in vietnam and the only thing we knew is when we went to the gulf war we were so good and the reagan dollars and what happened to america's military i remember being asked after the war by several think-tank groups that came in to talk about me. did you worry about where the enemy was? i didn't care. i just want to know what they were because it would be any that we ran into. it's been lost of where we were and what was going on at the different levels and never seeing any of these briefings. never seeing any of these briefings september, october, november. we didn't really know we were going to attack iraq sometime in december. we were defending saudi arabia and wasn't until sometime in december that we started working at shortstop's level they were on to offensive war planning but not
important to be here? why couldn't you do what you wanted to -- i mean, it's good for us, but why is it good for you? >> i think because here in the state states, something missing in europe is this ecosystem. we're talking about having the academy awards working hand in hand with venture capitalists, with the entrepreneur, with scientists, researchers, in order to innovate nap's really something that's missing. and, you know, replicating silicon valley is something that many, many countries have tried to do, right? the french president in the '60s tripe tried to replicate something, a place with similar weather in southern france, but it didn't work out. >> isn't there a case, though, that you could in a world there where there's a lot of virtual resource where is you may have people who are writing code for you in india or romania and you -- >> or italy. >> or italy. >> a lot of companies whose marketing and management are here while their developing centers are in italy. and i'm talking about a good friend, for example, an amazing association of entrepreneurs called mind bridge. that's th
useful." still, the penny remains in play. for starters, there is the arguable contention that everything will cost more because stores will round up their prices. then there are the pro-penny forces, including a penny preservation lobbying group started by a big zinc company. did we mention that pennies are more than 97% zinc? and there's no political push against the penny. a poll last year funded by the zinc industry showed that even though many americans give away, lose, otherwise ignore penny, 67% want to keep them away. a professor testified in 1990 for the pro-penny lobby. he actually thinks the economic case for getting rid of pennies is stronger now, but he doesn't see it happening under this particular president. >> i can't imagine a former member of congress from illinois is going to lead the way to get rid of the lincoln penny. >> sentimentality aside, abe and his monument are also on the $5 bill, the economic case for a penniless u.s. grows more compelling, giving ex-congressman kolbe hope. >> the polling is very clear that when people find out about the savin
. in fact we spend about 1% of the world's energy just making fertilizer for corn in the u.s. if that corn could take the nigtrogeghtrogen out of the air it like beans do, then we wouldn't have to fertilize corn. another important problem, we don't have enough drugs for diseases. we see these multidrug-resistant microbes popping up in hospitals and it's kind of scary. we need better drugs, i think this is an area where synthetic biology can really help. if you look around this room, nearly everything that we're in contact with is derived from petroleum. the carpet on the floor, the paint on the walls, the ceiling tiles, they all come from petroleum we have the potential to produce all of these products from sugar. so it could open up an entirely new avenue for agriculture, it could open up an environmentally-friendly way to produce all of these products that we use on a day-to-day basis. >> is that part of what drives you? do you look at the world just differently as a result of knowing how sugar could be substituted for these petroleum-based products? >> i don't know if i look at the worl
. and if you missed any part of today's show, find us on itunes. search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria: gps" is next. >>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you today and we begin with american politics. what is really happening? are the republicans on the defensive? will the automatic budget cuts happen? is there any chance of legislative deals? we have a great panel, paul krugman, mort zuckerman, arianna huffington, and ed conard. >>> then something special. an exclusive interview with the richest man in india, the second richest man in all of asia. mukesh ambani. why he's bullish on america. it was the first time television cameras were ever allowed in his extraordinary mansion in the sky. >>> then, everyone is worried about the arab spring. i talked to the leaders of five arab governments to get some answers. and a fascinating internal power struggle in iran and what it means. but first here's "my take." one of the great political debates in washington and around the
of us sinking into the supper 20s to low 30s. we'll talk about the slight warmup expected for the afternoon coming up. >>> we are following developing news out of san francisco. police are investigating a deadly shooting that happened just a few hours ago. they tell us a man was shot in the city's western edition. alex savidge is live there now. what can you tell us so far? >> reporter: we are getting very limited information from police this morning. that is because it's so early on in this investigation. a sergeant that was out here confirmed a man was shot and killed. he was found right over near this corner. near the intersection of hayes and webster. an anonymous caller reported gunfire in this area around 2:00 this morning. we'll show you that video. officers were out here for most of the morning. police tell us the victim was rushed to the hospital after suffering at least one gunshot wound. he died there from his injuries. homicide investigators searching for the shooter involved here. a sergeant told me they don't have a description on the person to put out. in ju
described with great exuberance the naval battle using wine glasses and decanters to show the position of the ships and blowing smoke from his cigar to imitate the cannon fire. it would have been wonderful to have been there. the topic at churchill's table were wide-ranging, and cold, exploding harbors, movies, that hamilton woman was a great favorite of churchill's, and politics. his curiosity was boundless. many of his guests wrote to friends or recorded in their diaries his conversations, repeated his anecdotes and commented on the foodie served. in addition i found hundreds of bills for dinner she gave at hundred hotels, the ritz, guest lists, amended wine lists, many letters from churchill complaining about overbilling, banking his friends for gifts of food and wine, ringing generous tips for hotel waiters call in the archives, all set out in my book. i have produced many of the menus in my book in case any of you want to try to duplicate one or two of them at a special party at home. the wine list might be harder for you to replicate since so many decades have passed since church
for us, the golden number in all demographics is 2.1. it's the replacement rate. in order for society to maintain the population. the average woman has two have 2.1 children over the course of her lifetime. if they have more than that. the society's population grows. if she has fewer then over time the population contracts and dismirning. -- diminishing. >> to some extend the process has been going on for centuries. the fact that birthrates have been going down. >> right. you could see in america the first good data it comes in 1800. from almost the founding you are able to see the fertility rates declining. by the time we hit the second world war we were around the replacement rate of 2.1. 2.2. immediately after the second world war we had the only major increase in fertility rate. that was the only one in history, that's the baby boom. that's the term that hit us, everybody knows about it. it was a remarkingble moment, not only did it increase quite, it went as high as 3.7, i think, for white americans and 3.9 for black americans. not only did it jump up, it stayed up for an entire
answers about his alleged steroid use. both kron and fox news will be recording the appeal proceedings on wednesday. you can watch coverage of the hearing on kron-four thoughout the evening. joe paterno's family is challenging the conclusion of an f-b-i report that paterno conspired to conceal sex abuse allegations against jerry sandusky. a report released this morning by the family of the legendary penn state coach says the observations of paterno by the f-b-i were unfounded. the f-b-i's findings were cited by the n-c-double-a when it handed down unprecedented sanctions against the penn state football program for the sandusky scandal. now to the latest on the storm that's pummeled the northeast. emergency crews and residents are clearing roadways and sidewalks. the storm being blamed for at least five deaths. you can see in the video on the left, dozens of cars stranded in the snow in long island. and on the right, that's timelapse video of the york city. about 400-thousand homes and businesses are still without power today. that's down from a high of 650-thousand. some school distric
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)